Does copywriting matter for estate agents?

You might think I’m biased on this – and you’re absolutely right – but when someone gets a badly written leaflet through their door, or reads the words “property” or “building” or “leasehold” spelt wrongly on an estate agent’s or property developer’s website, it does leave a bad taste in their mouth. And it’s not that uncommon. I’m not sure why the property industry is filled with so many people who have trouble spelling words associated with property, but it does. These people would do well to simply accept that, while spelling is not their best area, they don’t have to plaster illiteracy all over their website, or window, or brochure, or whatever. Help is at hand, and they should take it.

 

When it comes to marketing property (or your company) well, having great text that really paints a picture of what you’re looking to say is absolutely invaluable. Although spelling mistakes get on my nerves, what I spend more energy on when I see them is laughing at the company that put them there. Potential customers do that too. Don’t go around thinking a minor spelling error or two has no effect and doesn’t matter; it does. No customer who thinks bad spelling is unforgiveable is ever going to call you if you use bad spelling, so you’ll have no idea who you’re missing. On the other hand, nobody is going to give you a miss because you spell things right. So really, what’s the downside in good grammar?

 

What does copywriting cost? Well, let’s say you spent the grand sum of £500 on having some great copy written for your website or company marketing brochure. Sound like a lot? You could buy an iPad for that, and still have change for a slap-up meal. OK then, how much would it cost you if ONE potential vendor didn’t call you because the text about your company was badly written. I’d say at least 4 times that amount for agents outside London and 8 times upwards for agents in the capital. Now imagine that compounding year on year.

 

Estate agents who think decent copywriting isn’t important, may as well tell vendors they don’t need an estate agent to sell their home.