Do your property descriptions need restyling?

I hate editing.

Being presented with someone else’s work that’s written in their style and then being asked to edit it – but not rewrite it – is something I really don’t enjoy. Personally, I think if something needs enough editing to call in a copywriter, it needs rewriting.

I get that there’s a skill in managing to edit someone’s work while retaining their syntax, but my experience is that it takes about as much time to edit, if not more, as it does to do a complete rewrite. And I feel there’s a certain power in starting from scratch, unfettered by the past and with a clean blank page in front of you.

This comes up a reasonable amount when I’m approached my marketing companies or property developers to assist with the brochure for a new development. Very often, in a bid to get the work, the graphic design agency will have included copywriting in their quote and then filled said brochure with cliched text that could have been pulled from any marketing campaign. Simply change the address and – bingo! – one new set of marketing materials.

In some (cynical) respects, the approach is quite valid. People’s trust in property marketing can be rather low, so it could be argued that it doesn’t really matter what is written, because it doesn’t get read. That might be true, so long as you’re not really bothered about how much you sell your properties for, and if you think they’re not really that great anyway. But well-written copy can and does make the difference in taking a marketing campaign from kind of alright, to really successful. And if you’re building an exceptional new development want people to pay more money for the property you’re selling, you’re going to need to give them a really good reason to do so.

A good start would be to show an investment in your own product.